a tale of tails, tenacity, and tedium, as told by me, usually barefoot and bellowing

Saturday, December 26, 2015

Just Before Christmas

while making our rounds, we noticed the spring holding pond level had dropped.  A varmint had made his own path way.  The water was running under our over flow pipe instead of through it.
This job called for the Kubota King.  He did some digging in the levee and removed the culvert.
He dammed the exit to allow the water to fill to its maximum capacity.  We (I supervised) worked on moving rocks while the pond filled. 
These large rocks will turn most rain water away from the spring holding pond.
Time to break the dam
The water leaves swiftly flushing the holding pond.
The water follows the steam bed to the big spring pond.
The rocks under the ones to the right are ones my grandfather laid around an old oak barrel over the spring outlet.  Back then the water was carried by hand to the house.  The ones you see were added by Dad when the house was plumbed for water.  Now a submersible pump carries more than enough water to two houses with plenty left for the creek.  Although there are several bubbling springs within this area the main spring is inside the rock barrel.
After the pond flushed itself  Hubby did every thing in reverse.  Culvert installed at correct level to maintain the level we perfer.  Dirt placed and packed on culvert while keeping it level to drain.  Less than two hours the pond filled to the lip of the pipe and flows merrily on its way.

Once again crystal clear water at the correct level for the pump.  Gotta love tractors.  This used to be done by hand!  A spring that pumps hundreds of gallons a minute is simply a natural above ground well with sweet water from deep within Mother Earth.

15 comments:

eileeninmd said...

Good morning, I am glad your pond is back to normal. After all that hard work, thank God for your hubby and the tractor. Have a happy weekend!

Gorges Smythe said...

Well done!

Lynne said...

What a team . . .
I seem to learn more and more about you, and of the land you love, each time I visit.
I think that tractor is one of the farms best assets.
The best asset, the one driving it . . ,

Sandra said...

i love that shot of the pipe and the tractor and the Kubota King is magnificent. did i tell you that next to playing in fire, I LOVE playing with a tractor and also would love to be there to smash that open and let the water flow... i love playing with water to .. great post and i am so glad you did not have to do all that by hand... and also when done by hand no digital camera to show us your work,or computer to put it on.

M.E. Masterson said...

wahoo...thank God for plenty of water!! ps luv the header!

A Joyful Cottage said...

I don't think I've ever known a harder working pair that you and your man. You certainly keep busy! xo ~ Nancy

LindaG said...

A true blessing. :)

Lori Skoog said...

I sure am impressed!

Empty Nester said...

I would never have made it on a farm back in the day. Shoot, I probably wouldn't make it today. Even with a tractor! LOL Hope y'all had a marvelous Christmas!

Lowcarb team member said...

There really isn't time for rest!
But well done - on a good job.

All the best Jan

Far Side of Fifty said...

Thank goodness for water! :) Good job! :)

gld said...

A job well done! God bless tractors. You have to be pretty adept with that front end loader to do that kind of work. Looks like your husband is!

DesertHen said...

All in a days work and tractors do make things a bit easier! Glad the water flows again!

Sandy said...

Gail,

We do what we have to do by hand (years ago) and with the help of machinery and husbands :-) while we supervise.

Susan Anderson said...

Always work to be done at the farm, and you guys make it look easy. (Having said that, I know it is anything BUT easy!)

=)

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