a tale of tails, tenacity, and tedium, as told by me, usually barefoot and bellowing

Tuesday, May 4, 2010

I Promised A Tale...

of my weekend work but it's Monday and I think I've  forgotten.  I know I started with a walk, my camera died.  I piled some fallen limbs in the pasture.  I listened to the highland crew rumbling vehicles and cringed at the raping of the land.  I placed rocks in washed places and picked up flint chips. 

Eight AM on a Sunday, here comes another truck and they park at the gate where the horses have gathered.  I head that way to see if there's a problem.  No problem, waiting on equipment.  I asked,  coming
through the pasture? Yep.  Do you guys know how much it rained?  Nope.  The piece has tracks, no problem.  Well, I mentioned the last time they crossed that pasture when they were told to go another way, how they bogged down two vehicles and almost got the dozer stuck too (remember the pictures).  I was not heard.

Track equipment is wonderful for one thing...it does travel where wheels will not, but it also tears the land apart!  This is disturbing land that has probably never been tracked that deep.  Sometimes they even leave track piles on the county road that a car cannot cross.  Hush, Gail, you were gonna tell them about all the work you accomplished, remember, no griping allowed.
I headed to the creek to breathe deep and enjoy the quiet of my early Sunday morning, uh, not this week, that was another time BEFORE the crew.
The water cress is blooming so most of it is very hot to eat now but still good in a salad.  Conditions have been wonderful for it to grow and I add removing the water cress from the spring branches to my growing list of things to do.

I have been letting my horses out to graze in the yard and the spring valley since the grass is so wonderful.  They have been naughty.  They rolled in the freshly planted, things coming up already garden.  Charme walked over apple trees in the orchard and broke limbs off young trees just to scratch her belly.  Okay, guys, your freedom shall be limited now.

Opened the alternate pasture, remembered two sections were cut out of the web wire to get a tractor through to haul out logs for posts (a month ago).  Okay, here's your job, go get two cattle panels carry them to this section and Southern engineer the hole in the fence.  I get the Polaris and carefully balance a twelve foot panel across the bed and drive over all the lumps left by machinery, barely fit through the gate and finally get within forty feet of the fence...and the panel falls off.  I carry it the rest of the way, piece of cake, brace and tie it to a metal post and head out for the other panel.

The horses are grazing in their new section peacefully until I head back in with the second panel.  You could see the idea hit Charme, I swear there was a light bulb above her head.  She starts trotting to the hole in the fence.  I am hollering whoa, don't you dare, come back here, all this while I am reaching backwards with one arm where I won't lose this panel and bouncing toward the hole in the fence. Charme finally listened but I got that hateful look that she sometimes gives me when things don't go her way.

I am almost to the fence and same spot, the panel slides, I remember to let go as my shoulder is wrenched from its socket and also remember to stop the ranger.  So I am doing good here.  Carry this panel too, hook it into the other panel and it lacks six inches before it reaches the next post!  Go back to the ranger looking for wire, anything to fill that hole, found some wire, nothing to cut it.  I am not making twenty five trips back to the shop to get this done.  I am making do, Southern engineering all the way.  I found a hachet and a hammer and proceed to cut the wire.  It works and I weave my magic with the wire and the panels.

Whew, I am finished, no one has escaped and it is just noon!

13 comments:

the Bag Lady said...

If that had been me, our Houdini horse would have been long gone! And laughing all the way to the neighbour's place!
Good for you and your Southern Engineering and getting the job done. (And you must be very strong if those panels are the same as the ones we use - they are HEAVY!)

Eternally Distracted said...

I swear i felt tired after reading about all that hard work!!

Pyatshaw said...

I love the expression "Southern Engineering"!
Sounds a bit like our "Dae the noo" repair jobs.They often (=usually) end up permanent!

Judy said...

..and it's only noon...lots of time for other stuff...

mj said...

Loved your post. The life of a farm woman is a bit different from that of a city woman ... I'd like to compare "wish lists" with one city dweller some day. Quite different I would imagine! Steel-toed boots vs. five-inch heels? Wouldn't trade it for anything. Just saying.

Gramma Ann said...

Well, that was my laugh for the day. We never had horses when we farmed, just cows. And wouldn't you know, they always got out when I was the only one home. Those were the days and I am mighty glad they are behind me. hehe

ellen abbott said...

Geez Gail.

I don't blame your ill-humor over the construction and the crews. they just don't get it.

Rudee said...

I love ingenuity, and you seem to have it all!

An English Shepherd said...

What a busy day !

Wizz :-)

Far Side of Fifty said...

Hi Gail, Sounds like you made it work! In a timely fashion too..good thing you had no escapees:)

Pat said...

You are WOMAN hear you ROAR! Damn you are strong and ingenious! Who the heck needs a man around? I love your description of Charme and the lightbulb over her head. I could just picture it, and you screaming "Whoa!" while driving like a maniac! That put a grin on my face!

Lori E said...

Now can you bring home the bacon and fry it up in the pan? Is there anything this woman can't do? I think not. I love your self reliance.

Nezzy said...

Ya notice your never bored or have free time on a farm. We joke all the time about our 'spare' time.

Have a wonderful day!!!

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